Connect with us
William Faulkner William Faulkner

Interview

William Faulkner, The Art of Fiction

mm

Published

on

Interviewed by Jean Stein

William Faulkner was born in 1897 in New Albany, Mississippi, where his father was then working as a conductor on the railroad built by the novelist’s great-grandfather, Colonel William Falkner (without the “u”), author of The White Rose of Memphis. Soon the family moved to Oxford, thirty-five miles away, where young Faulkner, although he was a voracious reader, failed to earn enough credits to be graduated from the local high school. In 1918 he enlisted as a student flyer in the Royal Canadian Air Force. He spent a little more than a year as a special student at the state university, Ole Miss, and later worked as postmaster at the university station until he was fired for reading on the job.

Encouraged by Sherwood Anderson, he wrote Soldier’s Pay (1926). His first widely read book was Sanctuary (1931), a sensational novel which he says that he wrote for money after his previous books—including Mosquitoes (1927), Sartoris (1929), The Sound and the Fury (1929), and As I Lay Dying (1930)—had failed to earn enough royalties to support a family.

A steady succession of novels followed, most of them related to what has come to be called the Yoknapatawpha saga: Light in August (1932), Pylon (1935), Absalom, Absalom! (1936), The Unvanquished (1938), The Wild Palms (1939), The Hamlet (1940), and Go Down, Moses, and Other Stories (1941). Since World War II his principal works have been Intruder in the Dust (1948), A Fable (1954), and The Town (1957). His Collected Stories received the National Book Award in 1951, as did A Fable in 1955. In 1949 Faulkner was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature.

Recently, though shy and retiring, Faulkner has traveled widely, lecturing for the United States Information Service. This conversation took place in New York City, early in 1956.

 

INTERVIEWER

Mr. Faulkner, you were saying a while ago that you don’t like interviews.

WILLIAM FAULKNER

The reason I don’t like interviews is that I seem to react violently to personal questions. If the questions are about the work, I try to answer them. When they are about me, I may answer or I may not, but even if I do, if the same question is asked tomorrow, the answer may be different.

INTERVIEWER

How about yourself as a writer?

FAULKNER

If I had not existed, someone else would have written me, Hemingway, Dostoyevsky, all of us. Proof of that is that there are about three candidates for the authorship of Shakespeare’s plays. But what is important is Hamlet and A Midsummer Night’s Dream, not who wrote them, but that somebody did. The artist is of no importance. Only what he creates is important, since there is nothing new to be said. Shakespeare, Balzac, Homer have all written about the same things, and if they had lived one thousand or two thousand years longer, the publishers wouldn’t have needed anyone since.

INTERVIEWER

But even if there seems nothing more to be said, isn’t perhaps the individuality of the writer important?

FAULKNER

Very important to himself. Everybody else should be too busy with the work to care about the individuality.

INTERVIEWER

And your contemporaries?

FAULKNER

All of us failed to match our dream of perfection. So I rate us on the basis of our splendid failure to do the impossible. In my opinion, if I could write all my work again, I am convinced that I would do it better, which is the healthiest condition for an artist. That’s why he keeps on working, trying again; he believes each time that this time he will do it, bring it off. Of course he won’t, which is why this condition is healthy. Once he did it, once he matched the work to the image, the dream, nothing would remain but to cut his throat, jump off the other side of that pinnacle of perfection into suicide. I’m a failed poet. Maybe every novelist wants to write poetry first, finds he can’t, and then tries the short story, which is the most demanding form after poetry. And, failing at that, only then does he take up novel writing.

INTERVIEWER

Is there any possible formula to follow in order to be a good novelist?

FAULKNER

Ninety-nine percent talent … ninety-nine percent discipline … ninety-nine percent work. He must never be satisfied with what he does. It never is as good as it can be done. Always dream and shoot higher than you know you can do. Don’t bother just to be better than your contemporaries or predecessors. Try to be better than yourself. An artist is a creature driven by demons. He don’t know why they choose him and he’s usually too busy to wonder why. He is completely amoral in that he will rob, borrow, beg, or steal from anybody and everybody to get the work done.

INTERVIEWER

Do you mean the writer should be completely ruthless?

FAULKNER

The writer’s only responsibility is to his art. He will be completely ruthless if he is a good one. He has a dream. It anguishes him so much he must get rid of it. He has no peace until then. Everything goes by the board: honor, pride, decency, security, happiness, all, to get the book written. If a writer has to rob his mother, he will not hesitate; the “Ode on a Grecian Urn” is worth any number of old ladies.

INTERVIEWER

Then could the lack of security, happiness, honor, be an important factor in the artist’s creativity?

FAULKNER

No. They are important only to his peace and contentment, and art has no concern with peace and contentment.

INTERVIEWER

Then what would be the best environment for a writer?

FAULKNER

Art is not concerned with environment either; it doesn’t care where it is. If you mean me, the best job that was ever offered to me was to become a landlord in a brothel. In my opinion it’s the perfect milieu for an artist to work in. It gives him perfect economic freedom; he’s free of fear and hunger; he has a roof over his head and nothing whatever to do except keep a few simple accounts and to go once every month and pay off the local police. The place is quiet during the morning hours, which is the best time of the day to work. There’s enough social life in the evening, if he wishes to participate, to keep him from being bored; it gives him a certain standing in his society; he has nothing to do because the madam keeps the books; all the inmates of the house are females and would defer to him and call him “sir.” All the bootleggers in the neighborhood would call him “sir.” And he could call the police by their first names.

So the only environment the artist needs is whatever peace, whatever solitude, and whatever pleasure he can get at not too high a cost. All the wrong environment will do is run his blood pressure up; he will spend more time being frustrated or outraged. My own experience has been that the tools I need for my trade are paper, tobacco, food, and a little whiskey.

INTERVIEWER

Bourbon, you mean?

FAULKNER

No, I ain’t that particular. Between Scotch and nothing, I’ll take Scotch.

INTERVIEWER

You mentioned economic freedom. Does the writer need it?

FAULKNER

No. The writer doesn’t need economic freedom. All he needs is a pencil and some paper. I’ve never known anything good in writing to come from having accepted any free gift of money. The good writer never applies to a foundation. He’s too busy writing something. If he isn’t first rate he fools himself by saying he hasn’t got time or economic freedom. Good art can come out of thieves, bootleggers, or horse swipes. People really are afraid to find out just how much hardship and poverty they can stand. They are afraid to find out how tough they are. Nothing can destroy the good writer. The only thing that can alter the good writer is death. Good ones don’t have time to bother with success or getting rich. Success is feminine and like a woman; if you cringe before her, she will override you. So the way to treat her is to show her the back of your hand. Then maybe she will do the crawling.

INTERVIEWER

Can working for the movies hurt your own writing?

FAULKNER

Nothing can injure a man’s writing if he’s a first-rate writer. If a man is not a first-rate writer, there’s not anything can help it much. The problem does not apply if he is not first rate because he has already sold his soul for a swimming pool.

INTERVIEWER

Does a writer compromise in writing for the movies?

FAULKNER

Always, because a moving picture is by its nature a collaboration, and any collaboration is compromise because that is what the word means—to give and to take.

INTERVIEWER

Which actors do you like to work with most?

FAULKNER

Humphrey Bogart is the one I’ve worked with best. He and I worked together in To Have and Have Not and The Big Sleep.

INTERVIEWER

Would you like to make another movie?

FAULKNER

Yes, I would like to make one of George Orwell’s 1984. I have an idea for an ending which would prove the thesis I’m always hammering at: that man is indestructible because of his simple will to freedom.

INTERVIEWER

How do you get the best results in working for the movies?

FAULKNER

The moving-picture work of my own which seemed best to me was done by the actors and the writer throwing the script away and inventing the scene in actual rehearsal just before the camera turned on. If I didn’t take, or feel I was capable of taking, motion-picture work seriously, out of simple honesty to motion pictures and myself too, I would not have tried. But I know now that I will never be a good motion-picture writer; so that work will never have the urgency for me which my own medium has.

INTERVIEWER

Would you comment on that legendary Hollywood experience you were involved in?

FAULKNER

I had just completed a contract at MGM and was about to return home. The director I had worked with said, “If you would like another job here, just let me know and I will speak to the studio about a new contract.” I thanked him and came home. About six months later I wired my director friend that I would like another job. Shortly after that I received a letter from my Hollywood agent enclosing my first week’s paycheck. I was surprised because I had expected first to get an official notice or recall and a contract from the studio. I thought to myself, the contract is delayed and will arrive in the next mail. Instead, a week later I got another letter from the agent, enclosing my second week’s paycheck. That began in November 1932 and continued until May 1933. Then I received a telegram from the studio. It said: “William Faulkner, Oxford, Miss. Where are you? MGM Studio.”

I wrote out a telegram: “MGM Studio, Culver City, California. William Faulkner.”

The young lady operator said, “Where is the message, Mr. Faulkner?” I said, “That’s it.” She said, “The rule book says that I can’t send it without a message, you have to say something.” So we went through her samples and selected I forget which one—one of the canned anniversary-greeting messages. I sent that. Next was a long-distance telephone call from the studio directing me to get on the first airplane, go to New Orleans, and report to Director Browning. I could have got on a train in Oxford and been in New Orleans eight hours later. But I obeyed the studio and went to Memphis, where an airplane did occasionally go to New Orleans. Three days later, one did.

I arrived at Mr. Browning’s hotel about six p.m. and reported to him. A party was going on. He told me to get a good night’s sleep and be ready for an early start in the morning. I asked him about the story. He said, “Oh, yes. Go to room so-and-so. That’s the continuity writer. He’ll tell you what the story is.”

I went to the room as directed. The continuity writer was sitting in there alone. I told him who I was and asked him about the story. He said, “When you have written the dialogue I’ll let you see the story.” I went back to Browning’s room and told him what had happened. “Go back,” he said, “and tell that so-and-so—. Never mind, you get a good night’s sleep so we can get an early start in the morning.”

So the next morning in a very smart rented launch all of us except the continuity writer sailed down to Grand Isle, about a hundred miles away, where the picture was to be shot, reaching there just in time to eat lunch and have time to run the hundred miles back to New Orleans before dark.

That went on for three weeks. Now and then I would worry a little about the story, but Browning always said, “Stop worrying. Get a good night’s sleep so we can get an early start tomorrow morning.”

One evening on our return I had barely entered my room when the telephone rang. It was Browning. He told me to come to his room at once. I did so. He had a telegram. It said: “Faulkner is fired. MGM Studio.” “Don’t worry,” Browning said. “I’ll call that so-and-so up this minute and not only make him put you back on the payroll but send you a written apology.” There was a knock on the door. It was a page with another telegram. This one said: “Browning is fired. MGM Studio.” So I came back home. I presume Browning went somewhere too. I imagine that continuity writer is still sitting in a room somewhere with his weekly salary check clutched tightly in his hand. They never did finish the film. But they did build a shrimp village—a long platform on piles in the water with sheds built on it—something like a wharf. The studio could have bought dozens of them for forty or fifty dollars apiece. Instead, they built one of their own, a false one. That is, a platform with a single wall on it, so that when you opened the door and stepped through it, you stepped right off onto the ocean itself. As they built it, on the first day, the Cajun fisherman paddled up in his narrow, tricky pirogue made out of a hollow log. He would sit in it all day long in the broiling sun watching the strange white folks building this strange imitation platform. The next day he was back in the pirogue with his whole family, his wife nursing the baby, the other children, and the mother-in-law, all to sit all that day in the broiling sun to watch this foolish and incomprehensible activity. I was in New Orleans two or three years later and heard that the Cajun people were still coming in for miles to look at that imitation shrimp platform which a lot of white people had rushed in and built and then abandoned.

INTERVIEWER

You say that the writer must compromise in working for the motion pictures. How about his writing? Is he under any obligation to his reader?

Continue Reading

Interview

George Orwell: Saya tahu pada akhirnya harus duduk dan menulis buku

mm

Published

on

Pada usia 30 tahun seorang akan mengambil keputusan penting atau bahkan terpenting dalam hidupnya, memilih menjadi bos dan menikmati kesenangan mengendalikan banyak orang, atau menjalani hidup yang nyaris abadi dalam ritme sama sebagai pekerja loyal meski pun jengah.

Pilihan lain adalah duduk dan menulis buku, mengutuk dirinya sendiri tanpa pernah berpikir untuk meninggalkan tugasnya—menulis.

Tentu tidak sekaku dan seluruhnya demikian, tapi paling tidak demikian lah babak mental yang mendera seorang novelis George Orwell sebelum akhirnya, pada usia 30 tahun, ia memutuskan berhenti dari pekerjaan yang digeluti lima tahun sebelumnya yaitu sebagai Polisi Kerajaan India di Burma, lalu mulai menulis.

Pekerjaannya sebagai polisi Kerajaan India dan kemiskinan serta banyak kegagalan lain dalam hidupnya, kelak akan menguatkan intuisi alamiahnya untuk membenci otoritas (kekuasaan) dan menaruh perhatian lebih pada kelas pekerja, kelak hal itu akan banyak terlihat semangatanya dalam novelnya yang mashur “Animal Farm”.

Ia merasa sudah waktunya mengambil keputusan atau tidak sama sekali. Ia lantas menyelesaikan novel lengkapnya yang pertama: Burmuse Day. Tentu saja, dia sendiri mengakui novel itu sudah ia persiapkan cukup lama, bahkan sejak ia masih berusia belasan.

George Orwell

Pada usia lima atau enam tahun, demikian menurut Orwell Sendiri, “Saya menyadari saat itu, dan saya tahu masanya akan tiba; cepat atau lambat, saya harus duduk dan mulai menulis buku. Saya tidak boleh membunuh bakat alamaiah yang saya tahu telah mengandungnya sejak belia”, demikian pengakuannya.

Bukan hal mudah, bahkan seperti sebuah hal konyol, andaikan saja di usia 30 tahun, seorang berhenti dari kehidupannya sehari-hari dan memutuskan untuk menulis buku, Orwell sendiri dalam salah satu esainya tentang bagaimana menulis, ia menyatakan “Menulis buku itu mengerikan, perjuangan yang meletihkan, seperti sakit berkepanjangan. Seorang tak akan pernah berusaha menciptakan sesuatu jika tidak didorong oleh setan-setan yang dapat melawan atau memahami.”

Pertanyaannya adalah implus atau motif apa yang melatari, seperti halnya Orwell, memilih duduk dan menulis buku? Motif politik? Implus historis? Kesenangan estetis? Atau semuanya?

Sabiq Carebesth* dari Galeri Buku Jakarta mewawancari Orwell secara imajiner ihwal bagaimana mengarang dan dunia menulis yang disebutnya mengerikan dan menyakitkan–bahkan pada akhirnya sia-sia itu. Selengkapnya:

INTERVIEWER

Ini sederhana saja tampaknya, saya ingin bertanya seperti banyak orang menanyakan dengan konstan dan ringan pada sejawatnya yang penulis buku—kenapa Anda menulis?

GEORGE ORWELL

Saya telah menulis dalam sebuah esai dan saya pikir Anda pun telah membacanya, bahwa bagi saya seorang menulis, termasuk saya, paling tidak karena beberapa motif yang terus menerus menderu menjadi implus dalam pikiran. Egoisme, dalam bahasa yang mudah berupa implus untuk menjadi terkenal, tampak pintar, atau untuk dikenang setelah meninggal—itu selalu akan menjadi motif yang besar, meski hal itu menempatkan seseorang dalam kedewasaan yang semu sekedar untuk membalas hinaan atau sakit hati pada usaia kanak-kanak, adalah motif besar yang implusnya nyaris datang tanpa jeda pada masa-masa yang menentukan. Motif lainnya saya katakan adalah, antusiasme estetis. Persepsi tentang keindahan di dunia luar, dalam kata-kata dan susunan yang teratur. Rasa senang yang mencul dalam rima dan matra bahasa, dalam hasrat membagi yang sepatutnya dikenang… dan yang lain tentu saja adalah motif tentang tujuan politisdalam artinya yang paling luas. Suatu dorongan untuk menempatkan dunia dalam urutan pasti atau mengubah gagasan orang lain tentang ragam masyarakat.  

INTERVIEWER

Mari kita bicara motif anda, yang paling kuat dan mempengaruhi karangan anda?

GEORGE ORWELL

Saya rasa bahkan saya tidak bisa menjawab dengan pasti, bisa jadi bahwa semua motif itu terakumulasi dan sangat dipengaruhi oleh latar belakang dan lingkungan ketika penulis itu hidup. Hanya saja bagi saya, tak ada buku yang sama sekali bebas dari bias politik. Bahkan pendapat yang mengatakan bahwa seni tak bersinggungan sedikit pun dengan politik adalah sikap politik itu sendiri. Dan tahukah, bila saya menengok kembali karya saya, saya merasa kekurangan tujuan politis sehingga saya merasa seperti hanya menulis buku-buku yang tak bernyawa dan terpisah-pisah, penuh kalimat tanpa makna, kata-kata dekoratif, dan biasanya omong kosong.

INTERVIEWER

Tapi banyak orang bahkan menilai Anda, sebut saja dengan menulis novel Animal Farm, tampak begitu politis, dan bukankah buku tersebut memberi dampak yang luar biasa besar?

GEORGE ORWELL

Animal Farm adalah buku pertama yang saya coba dengan penuh kesadaran tentang apa yang harus saya lakukan, memadukan tujuan politis dengan tujuan artistik. Memang buku itu memliki semangat untuk mengkritik kehidupan publik pada masanya—dan saya menulisnya setelah tujuah tahun sebelumnya tidak menulis novel. Tapi pada masa itu saya tahu saya ingin menulis sesegara mungkin. Saya rasa itu bentuk kegagalan, tapi wajar, pada dasarnya semua buku adalah kegagalan—tetapi bedanya Animal Farm, saya menulisnya dengan kesadaran pasti apa yang ingin saya tulis.

INTERVIEWER

Jadi bukankah itu novel yang kuat motif politisnya?

GEORGE ORWELL

Saya tidak ingin mengatakan itu sebagai impresi final. Pada dasarnya, semua penulis itu sia-sia, mementingkan diri sendiri, dan malas, serta pada motif mereka yang paling dasar, adalah benar-benar misteri. Jadi saya pun tak dapat mengatakan dengan pasti, meski jika anda memaksa, saya tetap tak bisa mengatakan dengan pasti mana motif yang paling kuat. Tapi saya bisa katakana bahwa buku sebaiknya memiliki motif politis.

INTERVIEWER

Animal Farm

Mari kita andaikan bahwa penulis perlu memiliki motif politis, sekaligus estetis, bagaimana pengalaman Anda terkait hal itu?

GEORGE ORWELL

Apa yang ingin saya lakukan saat itu adalah, membuat tulisan politis yang masuk ke ranah seni. Titik pijak saya selalu dari sikap partisan, rasa ketidakadilan sosial. Jadi saat saya duduk untuk mulai menulis, saya tak berkata pada diri sendiri “Saya akan membuat karya seni”, tapi saya menulisnya karena begitu banyak dusta yang ingin saya ungkap. Namun kemudian saya pun sadar saya tidak bisa bekerja menulis buku, atau bahkan artikel panjang untuk majalah, jika tanpa pengalaman estetis. Jadi saya katakana akhirnya saya tak bisa membuang salah satunya, bahwa karya sastra bagaimana pun ditulis sebagai karya “pamflet” ia tetap tidak akan sepenuhnya menjadi seuatu propaganda. Tugas penulis saya rasa adalah mendamaikan suka dan benci, non individual, aktivitas publik yang mendasar dan mandarah daging, yang pada masa sekarang menyerang kita semua.

INTERVIEWER

Baiklah, mari kita bicara hal yang lebih ringan dari porses kreatif Anda, kapan pertama kali anda menulis dan merasa pada akhirnya harus (menjadi) penulis?

GEORGE ORWELL

Saat saya berusia lima atau enam tahun, saya benar-benar telah menyadari keinginan itu, bahwa cepat atau lambat, pada akhirnya saya akan duduk dan menulis buku. Selama 24 tahun usia saya mencoba melepaskan pikiran itu, tapi nyatanya pikiran itu terus mengisi benak saya. Saya harus katakana bahwa sampai usia 8 tahun saya nyaris tak pernah melihat ayah saya, dua saudara (adik dan kakak) saya masing-masing dari kami berbeda lima tahun usianya. Untuk alasan ini dan itu, saya menjadi pribadi yang penyendiri. Di sekolah saya merasa disepelakan dan hal itu, atau entah karena hasrat saya untuk menulis lebih besar, saya benar-benar gagal dalam pergaulan sosial. Saya menulis puisi pertama saya pada usia lima tahun. Saya mendiktekan dan ibu saya menulisnya, jadi saya merasa ibu saya saja yang mengerti dunia menulis saya. Saya terus menulis buku harian sejak usia lima tahun dan pada usia enam belas tahun saya benar-benar tak bisa melepaskan diri dari rasa nikmat menjelajahi kata-kata, termasuk suara dan asosiasi kata-kata. Saya jatuh cinta dan rasanya mustahil membebaskan diri dari hal itu.

INTERVIEWER

Rasa nikmat menulis—meski begitu meletihkan dan bukan dunia yang bisa dikatakan dunia yang mujur? Lalu apa pesan Anda untuk para penulis setelah Anda, mengingat menulis bukan dunia yang mudah bahkan cenderung sakit?

GEORGE ORWELL

Saya melihat pada kurun usaia tertentu, katakanlah usia 30 an, seorang melepaskan individualitasnya, dia berhadapan dengan dunia eksternal yang tak terhindarkan—memimpin orang lain atau menenggelamkan diri dalam lautan pekerjaan yang menjemukan. Namun, saya percaya, selalu ada orang-orang berbakat yang jumlahnya sedikit, orang-orang yang dengan sengaja membiarkan hidupnya berlangsung hingga akhir, dan para penulis berada di tempat ini. Para penulis yang serius, saya katakan demikian, memiliki kesombongan yang lebih menyeluruh dan egois dibanding para jurnalis, walau mereka kurang tertarik dengan uang. (SC)

*) Sabiq Carebesth, disarikan dari esai utama George Orwell “Mengapa Saya Menulis” dan esai lainnya dalam “Orwell, A Collection of Essays” (Penguin Book, 1970)

 

Continue Reading

Interview

Octavio Paz, Puisi Panjang dan tanda (resmi) perpuisian

mm

Published

on

Dia salah satu penyair Meksiko terbesar, bahkan salah satu yang terbesar dan otoriatif yang dimiliki dunia perpuisian modern. Alam pikiran dan pengalamannya mengembara melampaui ruang dan waktu, secara fisik dan juga metafisik—ia Octavio Paz,  seorang yang sukses sebagai penyair, juga dalam karirnya sebagai diplomat untuk negaranya.

Menjelajah peradaban Amerika sebagai salah satu korp diplomatik Meksiko pada 1941-1945, mengembara ke India juga sebagai duta besar negaranya dari 1962-1968—seni dan filsafat timur pun diserapnya. Sebagai warga negara selatan ia memahami sosialisme dan ‘budaya’ revolusi meski ia juga tak gentar mengkritik realisme-sosialis dalam medan kasustraan; ia tinggal dan menyerap paham kapitalisme ala Amerika selama tinggal di sana—dan ia pun tak kalah galaknya dalam melabrak cara pandang kebudayaan dan sastra Amerika yang selalu berbau Anglocentrik.

Kesastrawannya memang tiidak terburu-buru, meski ia telah menulis dan mempelajari puisi sejak masih muda belia, namun ia baru menandai kesastrawannya dalam terbitan kumpulan sajaknya pada tahun 1949. Setahun kemudian, ia menerbitkan esai tentang Meksiko “Labirin Kesunyian” (1950) yang lantas diterjemahkan ke hampir semua bahasa Eropa. Kedalaman visi pengetahuan dan ketegasan sikap politiknya tak diragukan, ia mengundurkan diri menjadi diplomat negara untuk India sebagai bentuk protes atas pembantain brutal yang dilakukan negaranya pada kaum pelajar di Mexico City. Ia mendirikan majalah kebudayaan yang pedas dalam kritik, Plural, (1971), Vuelta (1976)—kedunya dibredel penguasa.

Berkat kerja nyata dan siasat kebudayaan yang dikerjakannya dalam membela kemanusiaan ia diganjar berbaai penghargaan, dan yang paling bergengsi tentu saja adalah beroleh Nobel Sastra pada 1990. Pada 19 April 1998 Paz wafat karena kanker.

Sebelum meninggalnya karena kanker, dunia mencatat tujuh esai Paz paling monumental tentang sastra, dunia kita hingga relasinya dengan revolusi yang demamnya melanda bangsa-bangsa di dunia pada masa hidupnya. Tujuh esai yang lantas bertajuk “The Other Voice” tersebut merupakan “investasi” pemikirannya sejak esai pertama yang ditulisnya pada 1941—berisi pandangan meditatif Paz yang dimulai dari permenungannya tentang dunia puisi dari romantisme hingga simbolisme dan gerakan avant Grade. Salah astu pertanyaan terpenting esai tersebut adalah pertanyaan yang ia ajukan sendiri: “Dimana kira-kira tempat puisi pada waktu yang akan datang?”

Meski dimulai dari permenungan tentang puisi, buku “The Other Voice”, sebagaimana dicatat Helen Lane dalam pengantar untuk buku tersebut, berbicara juga tentang kondisi masyarakat kontemporer, filsafat, ideologi, revolusi dan tentang Paz sendiri, diri sang penyair—seorang modernis dan dan visioner. Seorang pemikir yang terus reasah-gelisah dan prihatin namun optimis terhadap perkembangan zaman.

Dalam tulisan berbentuk interview imajiner ini, penulis hanya akan meringkas pemikiran Paz tentang dunia puisi—atau dari sudut pandang puisi-penyair atas realitas dunia kontemporer (dalam bagian kedua interview). Ringkasan jawaban Paz secara utuh bisa didapati dalam bukunya “The Other Voice” (Suara Lain):

INTERVIEWER

Apa Puisi buat Anda, atau bagaimana ungkapan itu (puisi) memiliki artinya bagi Anda?

OCTAVIO PAZ

Pertama izinkan saya mengutip Antonio Machado untuk menjawab pertanyaan tersebut, Machado menulis: “Sejarah yang hidup dinyanyikan dengan memadahkan alun nadanya”.

Saya mulai menulis puisi pada waktu masih muda belia dan sejak itu pula saya membayangkan tentang bagaimana menulisnya. Puisi adalah suatu pekerjaan yang paling ambigu: suatu tugas dan sebuah misteri, suatu masa lalu dan suatu sakramen, sebuah profesi, dan suatu hasrat atau nafsu.

Saya ingin katakan hal itu pada mulanya seperti sebuah meditasi (barangkali kata itu lebih tepat karena keserampangannya, untuk menyebutnya sebagai suatu penyimpangan yang tidak beraturan) tentang perbedaan-perbedaan besar puitik dan pengalaman manusia: kesunyian, komuni, communion. Saya melihat hal itu dalam personifikasi dua orang penyair yang saya baca dengan penuh gairah; Quevedo dan Saint Jhon the Cross dalam buku karya mereka Lagrimas de un penitente dan Cantico spiritual.

INTERVIEWER

Dalam beberapa esai yang Anda tulis, anda tampak mengagumi puisi panjang dan memberi penilian tinggi atasnya ketimbang puisi pendek. Bagaimana Anda menilai dan menjelaskan hal tersebut?

OCTAVIO PAZ

Saya mambahas secara khusus mengenai “extensive poem”, puisi panjang—di mana itu adalah bentuk puitik yang telah memperoleh nasib baik dalam abad XX. Saya tidak bermaksud mengatakan bahwa puisi-puisi modern yang terbaik adalah puisi-puisi yang panjang. Sebaliknya malah lebih mendekati kebenaran: intensitas dari puisi yang terdiri dari atas tiga atau empat baris sering mampu menembus tembok waktu. Tetapi, puisi panjang—yang ditulis oleh T.S. Eliot, Saint John Perse, dan Juan Ramon Jimenez, saya berikan tiga contoh yang terkenal—merupakan ekspresi era kita, dan telah meninggalkan jejaknya tentang hal itu.

Jadi dapat dikatakan bahwa extensive poem adalah sebuah puisi yang panjang. Selama dalam pengertian itu kata-kata datang berurutan satu sama lain, suatu puisi yang ekstensif dengan demikian bisa berarti sebuah puisi yang terdiri dari banyak baris dan pembacaanya membutuhkan waktu tertentu. Ruang dan waktu.

INTERVIEWER

Namun berapa panjang sebuah puisi dapat dipandang sebagai sebuah puisi ekstentif? Terdiri dari berapa banyak baris?

OCTAVIO PAZ

Mahabharata terdiri lebih dari dua ratus ribu sajak, sementara bagi orang Jepang, sau Uta—sebagai puisi panjang—terdiri dari tiga puluh sampai empat puluh sajak; Soledades karya Gongora berisi dua ribu sajak; Primero Sueno karya Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz kira-kira seribu sajak dan Divina Comedia karya Dante terdiri dari lima belas ribu sajak. Sebaliknya puisi The Waste Land hanya terdiri dari empat ratus tiga puluh empat sajak. Jadi dalam hal ini panjang pendek adalah realtif. Ia berupa istilah yang bersifat variable bebas, tidak tetap. Jumlah persajakan (verses) bukan masalah sama sekali, kita membutuhkan factor-faktor lain untuk menjelaskan hal ini.

Saya ambil Paul Valery yang pernah berkata bahwa sebuah puisi panjang, merupakan mengembangan dari suatu ekslamasi, suatu seruan. Yakni suatu formula singkat dan jelas namun toh masih membutuhkan suatu pengembangan. Dalam puisi pendek awal dan akhir berpadu, menyatu hingga jarang kita dapati pengembangan apa pun. Awal dan akhir dengan gamblang dapat dibedakan, terang, jelas, setiap persajakannya memiliki fisiogno-minnya sendiri-sendiri tetapi pada waktu yang bersamaan semuanya tak dapat dipisahkan. Pada puisi panjang, bagian-bagiannya bersifat nyaris otonom, benar-benar ada seagai bagian-bagian (dari keseluruhan). Contohnya, episode Paolo dan Francesca daam Inferno karya Dante, atau episode Dante dan Matilda pada ahkhir penggambarannya melewati purgatory.

INTERVIEWER

Mari kita detailkan, inti dari pembeda puisi panjang dan puisi pendek, dan mengapa ada cenderung pada yang pertama?

OCTAVIO PAZ

Perpuisian ditentukan oleh prinsip keanekaan dalam kesatuan yang bersifat ganda. Dalam puisi-puisi yang pendek, keanekaan dikorbankan demi kesatuan; pada puisi-puisi panjang, puisi itu mencapai kesempurnaan sebagai puisi tanpa mengorbankan atau merusak kesatuan (unity). Jadi, boleh dibilang, pada puisi panjang kita bukan hanya menemukan perpanjangan atau perluasan yang sebenarnya merupakan suatu dimensi yang relatif, tetapi juga keanekaan yang maksimum.

Tambahan lagi, puisi ekstensif memenuhi persyaratan ganda lain yang rapat hubungannya dengan hukum keanekaan dalam kesatuan: pengulangan dan kejutan. Pengulangan merupakan prinsip utama dalam perpuisian. Matra dan aksen-aksennya, rima (rhyme), julukan (epithet) dalam karya-karya Homerus dan penyair-penyair lainnya; frase dan insiden berulang seperti motif-motif musical yang tersedia sebagai tanda-tanda untuk memberi tekanan pada kesinambungan. Perbedaan lain yang lebih besar lagi adalah jeda atau penghentian, pergantian, penemuan—singkatnya, ketakterdugaan.

Bila kita reduksi sampai ke bentuk paling sederhana dan esensial, puisi adalah sebuah madah, alias nyanyian. Nyanyian bukanlah suatu diskursus atau penjelasan. Pada puisi pendek, latar belakang dan hampir semua keadaan yang mengitarinya, yang merupakan sebab atau objek nyanyian, dihilangkan atau diabaikan. Yang saya maksud adalah: pada gilirannya nyanyian menjadi cerita, dan akhirnya cerita menjadi nyanyian—seperti dalam puisi ekstensif.

INTERVIEWER

Ada yang hendak Anda tambahkan lagi?

OCTAVIO PAZ

Sebuah puisi ekstensif harus memuaskan suatu kebutuhan rangkap: keanekaan dalam kesatuan dan kombinasi dari pengulangan dan kejutan. Hal itu mengembangkan dan bukan sekedar mengakumulasi.

Sebutlah dalam Soledades saya tidak menemukan pengembangan, melainkan hanya akumulasi—yang seringkali membosankan dan bertele-tele dari fragmen dan detil-detilnya. Soledades adalah suatu tatahan potongan-potongan yang memang indah tapi tidak berarti. Puisi-puisi itu tidak memiliki aksi, taka da cerita, dan dipenuhi dengan penjelasan tambahan yang panjang dan berbelit-belit serta pemakain kata yang terlalu banyak yang sebenarnya tidak perlu.

Anda harus memahami hal ini; apakah kita membaca sebuah puisi dengan penuh gairah? Antusiasme—hiruk pikuk dan kegila-gilaan yang bersifat ketuhanan—merupakan tanda (resmi) perpuisian. (*)

*) Sabiq Carebesth, penyair, editor in chief Galeri Buku Jakarta.

Continue Reading

Interview

Edmund Husserl: “Pengalaman Itu Sendiri Bukan Sains”

mm

Published

on

Menjelang akhir karirnya, Husserl menulis bahwa impiannya untuk meletakkan sains di atas pondasi yang kuat; telah berakhir! Apa yang terjadi? Sementara filsafat fenomenologi karyanya bahkan telah menjadi salah satu paling diminati dan menjadi pondasi bagi kemajuan filsafat sejak abad 20?

Edmund Husserl adalah filsuf yang dihantui mimpi yang latarnya telah dipenuhi oleh para pemikir sejak zaman Socrates: mimpi tentang kepastian!

Untuk Socrates, masalahnya seperti ini: meskipun kita mudah mencapai kesepakatan tentang pertanyaan yang berkaitan dengan hal-hal yang dapat kita ukur (misalnya, “berapa banyak zaitun yang ada di botol ini?”), namun ketika sampai pada pertanyaan filosofis seperti “apakah keadilan itu?” atau “apa itu kecantikan?”, sepertinya tidak ada cara yang jelas untuk mencapai kesepakatan definisi atas pertanyaan itu. Dan jika kita tidak tahu pasti apa itu keadilan, lalu bagaimana kita bisa berbicara tentang keadilan itu?

Masalah Kepastian

Husserl adalah seorang filsuf yang memulai “keheranannya” sebagai seorang matematikawan. Dia bermimpi dan terus memikirkannya; permasalahan seperti “apa itu keadilan?” bisa diselesaikan seperti bagaimana seorang menyelesaikan masalah matematika “berapa banyak zaitun yang ada di toples?” dengan kata lain, Husserl berharap untuk menempatkan semua ilmu pengetahuan—apapun cabang pengetahuan dan aktifitas manusia, dari matematika, kimia dan fisika hingga etika dan politik–dalam dasar yang lebih utuh.

Teori-teori ilmiah didasarkan pada pengalaman. Tetapi Husserl percaya bahwa pengalaman saja tidak menambah ilmu pengetahuan, karena sebagaimana diketahui oleh semua ilmuwan, pengalaman penuh dengan semua jenis asumsi, bias, dan kesalahpahaman.

Husserl ingin melepaskan semua ketidakpastian ini untuk memberikan kepada ilmu pengetahuan suatu pondasi dasar yang pasti.

Untuk melakukan ini, Husserl menelaah pemikiran filsafat dari seorang filsuf abad ke-17; Rene Descartes. Seperti Husserl, Descartes ingin membebaskan filsafat dari semua asumsi, bias, dan keraguan. Descartes menulis bahwa meskipun hampir semuanya bisa diragukan, ia tidak dapat meragukan bahwa ia meragukannya—layaknya adagium cogito ergo sum—saya berpikir maka saya ada.

Fenomenologi

Husserl mengambil pendekatan yang mirip dengan Descartes, tetapi menggunakannya secara berbeda. Dia menyarankan bahwa jika kita mengadopsi sikap ilmiah untuk mengalami, mengesampingkan setiap asumsi yang kita miliki (bahkan termasuk asumsi bahwa dunia eksternal ada di luar kita), maka kita dapat memulai filsafat dengan bersih, bebas dari semua asumsi.

Husserl menyebut pendekatannya ini dengan “fenomenologi”: penyelidikan filosofis tentang fenomena pengalaman. Kita perlu melihat pengalaman dengan sikap ilmiah, meletakkan ke satu sisi (atau “mengurung keluar” sebagaimana Husserl menyebutnya) setiap asumsi kita. Dan jika kita melihat dengan hati-hati dan cukup sabar, kita dapat membangun landasan pengetahuan yang dapat membantu kita mengatasi masalah filosofis yang telah ada bersama kita sejak awal filsafat.

Namun, para filsuf yang berbeda mengikuti metode Husserl dan mendapatkan hasil yang berbeda, dan ada sedikit perbedaan tentang apa sebenarnya metode itu, atau bagaimana seseorang mempraktikkannya.

Menjelang akhir karirnya, Husserl menulis bahwa impiannya untuk meletakkan sains di atas pondasi yang kuat; telah berakhir!

Tetapi meskipun fenomenologi Husserl gagal mendorong filsafat dengan pendekatan ilmiah untuk pengalaman, atau untuk memecahkan masalah filsafat yang telah bertahan lama, tetapi pemikiran Husserl bagaimana pun telah melahirkan salah satu tradisi terkaya dalam pemikiran abad ke-20. (*)

*) diterjemahkan Susan Gui (ed; Sabiq Carebesth), dari Edmund Husserl and Phenomenology  (The Philosohy Book; DK London, 2011).

Continue Reading

Classic Prose

Trending